Awards


In 2013 Former Chancellor Charles Bantz and Dr. Sandra Petronio established the Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award because translational work is core to the schools of IUPUI. The award recognizes outstanding faculty research that is interdisciplinary and/or cross-disciplinary, and intentionally directed toward positively impacting people’s lives within or beyond the State of Indiana. In addition to generating knowledge through scientific inquiry or humanistic scholarship, the award recognizes faculty that actively endeavor to transform that knowledge into practices or solutions, demonstrating innovative ways to improve the lives of individuals and the communities in which they live.

2017 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

 Professor Kelley, 2017 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Mark R. Kelley, PhD, was awarded the 2017 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award in recognition of his exemplary translational research in the area of cancer.

Since joining the Department of Pediatrics at the IU School of Medicine in 1993, Dr, Kelley’s work has focused on translational research in DNA damage and repair, specifically, to determine how those activities can be exploited therapeutically to treat cancers and protect normal cells from DNA damage.

He has focused specifically on the enzyme called APE1 as a therapeutic target in cancers and other diseases. Dr. Kelley discovered and has been developing a specific inhibitor of APE1 which he is now translating to clinical trials. This work has also led to the creation of a biotechnology company called Apexian Pharmaceuticals, of which Dr. Kelley is the Chief Scientific Founder and Officer.

The first drug developed has recently been approved by the FDA for Phase 1 clinical trials in cancer patients scheduled to begin in 2017. The drug has potential uses in a number of cancers including ovarian, colon, bladder, pancreatic, leukemia, and other adult and pediatric cancers.

He is also exploring the use of the target APE1 and the drug to prevent a major side-effect of cancer treatments called chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).

Dr. Kelley is committed to fast-tracking collaboration and translational research efforts in order to find more effective cancer treatments. He also mentors and encourages students, post-doctorates, fellows and junior faculty in translating their research into practice to expand the number of discoveries that help solve problems and make life better.

Congratulations, Professor Kelley!


2016 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Patricia Scott, PhD, 2016 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Patricia Scott, PhD, was awarded the 2016 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award based on her outstanding translational research.

Roles are sets of activities performed in a routine way, for example, work, friendship, volunteerism, hobbyist, or maintaining a home. The roles we participate in structure our lives, and govern the way we see ourselves and others see us. As life moves forward we develop habits and routines that enable us to meet the expectations of these various roles. Roles are the ‘how’ of social participation. Human beings we are social in nature, and make choices based on our interests and values. Through this social interaction we identify ourselves through roles, ‘I am a student at IUPUI’, ‘this is my sister Joanne’, and ‘David is an engineer who works with my brother-in-law’.

As an occupational therapist, Dr. Scott treated people with problems stemming, in part, from lack of participation in valued roles. Many of these people have trouble with role identification. It is socially awkward to say, ‘this is my brother who just got out of prison’, and ‘I cannot work because I have schizophrenia ’, or ‘I cannot attend because I lost my license for driving drunk’.

In 1997, Dr. Scott's own role identification was threatened. She was told her 20-year course of autoimmune hepatitis caused irreversible cirrhosis, and the only option was liver transplantation. She did not want to take on the role of a patient or a ‘sick’ person, and importantly she did not know how. She scoured the research literature for information that would help her understand what her life would be like during and after transplantation. She found very little. There is extensive evidence about the life saving aspects of transplantation, however, little to assist those individuals who struggle to return to life as they knew it before transplantations. And life after transplantation IS different. Aside from her own situation, as an occupational therapist, she realized if she had this problem, many others likely did also. She has since devoted herself to a research career with the goal of increasing the number of individuals who have access to information and health care services such that they can return to full meaningful participation in life post-transplant. Phase I, revealed that post-transplant participation in a higher number of valued roles as measured by the Role Checklist, is significantly associated with higher SF-36 scores. Phase II is a longitudinal study, measuring timing of return to activities of daily living and valued roles at 15 points over the first 2 years post-transplant. Phase III moved her work into determining the best interventions to support individuals struggling to resume meaningful life participation after transplantation. Her presentations and publications caught the work of colleagues.

Ironically, it was the innovative use, and modification of the Role Checklist, a long standing tool used by occupational therapists, which catapulted her work into the international spotlight. In 2012 she established a formal collaboration with International colleagues and now, in Version 3 of the Role Checklist, with tested translation guidelines and international cross-cultural validation studies in place, her aspiration to establish the first globally accepted measure of participation appears closer than ever.

Dr. Scott's work to enable more individuals to engage in full participation in society, not only following liver transplantation but through establish a cross-culturally valid role participation tool, is another example of how IUPUI's faculty members are translating their research into practice. Dr. Scott is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy in the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences.


Congratulations, Professor Scott!

2015 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Hickman.jpg Professor Hickman, 2015 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Susan Hickman, PhD, was awarded the 2015 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award in recognition of her exemplary translational research in the area of aging and end of life care.

Dr. Hickman is committed to optimizing the quality of life for older adults in life’s final chapter through improved decision-making and communication about treatment preferences. A primary focus of her research has been on use of the Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Program to communicate patient treatment preferences as actionable medical orders. This tool helps ensure that patient preferences are known and communicated to improve continuity of care. Findings from her research have been widely disseminated and used to support the development of programs based on the POLST model.

Dr. Hickman also co-founded the Indiana Patient Preferences Coalition, a group of individuals and organizational representatives from across Indiana in law, medicine, nursing, senior care, and ethics. This coalition created Indiana POST (Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment), based on the national POLST model. Dr. Hickman now provides education and facilitation skills training about POST to health care providers around the state. She also serves as the Palliative Care Core lead on a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services innovations grant to reduce avoidable hospitalizations and improve the quality of care in 19 Indianapolis-area nursing facilities. Additional work includes a collaboration with colleagues at IU Health that has resulted in the launch of the Encompass Initiative, designed to improve primary palliative care throughout the academic health system.

Dr. Hickman’s work to improve quality of life for older adults in life’s final chapter is another example of how IUPUI’s faculty members are translating their research into practice. Dr. Hickman is Community and Health Systems Professor in the IU School of Nursing and Co-Director, IUPUI Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Signature Center.


Congratulations, Professor Hickman!

2014 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

jak400diamond.jpg Jeffrey A. Kline, MD, 2014 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Jeffrey Kline, MD, was awarded the 2014 Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award based on his outstanding translational research. Dr. Kline has transformed the way physicians think about, diagnose, and treat pulmonary embolism (PE). The direct application of his work has saved countless lives and prevented unnecessary testing in hundreds of thousands of other patients who present with high risk medical situations. For instance, if you ask an Emergency Medicine physician how they think about PE, you will hear about the PERC rule (Pulmonary Embolism Rule out Criteria). This was created by Dr. Kline and has fundamentally changed the approach to the patient who presents with chest pain or shortness of breath. It is also because the elegance and rigor of his studies, coupled with the clarity of his language, that his work is translated into clinical practice around the world.  

His diagnostic research interests focus on human affect analysis, pretest probability, and novel breath-based instruments to reduce overuse of medical imaging. His human treatment research includes randomized trials of fibrinolysis and inhaled nitric oxide to reduce heart damage from blood clots in the lungs. Dr. Kline’s current work focuses on using the human face as a diagnostic instrument to further help doctors make informed decisions about diagnostic testing for blood clots. His laboratory work focuses on mechanisms and treatment of acute pulmonary hypertension from pulmonary embolism, animal models of pulmonary embolism, and a nanoparticle-delivered enzyme, plasmin, to promote clot lysis without increasing risk. He helped set up an advanced hospital treatment program for patients with severe PE, and he also created and currently runs a clinic specifically to allow patients diagnosed with blood clots in the emergency department to receive treatment at home, rather than in the hospital.

Dr. Kline’s work on an interdisciplinary team including faculty and students focusing on the human face as a diagnostic instrument is an excellent example of the translational research efforts of IUPUI. Dr. Kline is Professor of Emergency Medicine, Professor of Physiology, and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine, IU School of Medicine.

Congratulations, Professor Kline!

Inaugural Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Marerro_TRIP_Bantz_Petronio_Award_2013.jpg Professor David Marerro (left) with Chancellor Charles R. Bantz (right) and Professor Sandra Petronio (center)

The inaugural Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award was presented at the IUPUI Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation on Friday, April 26, 2013. The award recognizes outstanding faculty research that is interdisciplinary and/or cross-disciplinary, and intentionally directed toward positively impacting people’s lives within or beyond the State of Indiana. In addition to generating knowledge through scientific inquiry or humanistic scholarship, the faculty member should actively endeavor to transform that knowledge into practices or solutions, demonstrating innovative ways to improve the lives of individuals and the communities in which they live.

In presenting the award, Chancellor Charles R. Bantz stated, “Translational work is core to the schools of IUPUI. That is why we established the Center for Translating Research into Practice, and why Professor Sandra Petronio was willing to give her time to launching the Center and the TRIP initiative. Sandra and I established this award with a monetary gift to recognize outstanding translational work by the IUPUI faculty.”

The 2013 inaugural recipient of the award is DAVID MARRERO, J.O. RITCHEY ENDOWED PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.

Since joining our campus in 2004, Professor Marrero has excelled at translating research into improvements of diabetes identification and management. He has been an invaluable leader for the Translating Research into Action for Diabetes study for more than 10 years. This work showed that improving risk factors depends upon tailoring disease management programs to specific populations to better address health disparities. In a practical application of this work, he and his colleagues have developed a tablet-based program that explains what risks of cardiovascular disease an individual person has and then educates on reducing those risks. He also implemented an innovative and successful program at the YMCA to assist in the identification of persons at risk for diabetes followed by educational and behavioral interventions focused on diet and exercise. This project is now the subject of a CMS demonstration project.

Dr. Marrero exemplifies a scholar who generates knowledge through scientific inquiry and applies that knowledge to address everyday problems in our communities. His colleagues at the national level describe him as a tireless and innovative researcher and leader in moving results into action for improved health.

Congratulations, Professor Marerro!